March/April 2018 - A Small But Important Rules Change

placeholder image

March/April 2018 - A Small But Important Rules Change

At their annual meeting late in 2017, World Sailing passed some small changes in the Racing Rules of Sailing. None of them change the right-of-way rules, but they do change rules that I have discussed in the past two years.

 

In my May 2017 article, I discussed the new rule about “Support Persons”. A support person can be anyone assisting a competitor, including parents and coaches. The 2017 rulebook introduced a definition of a support person and it attempted to indicate how a support person and the boat supported by that person could be penalized. US Sailing identified a problem with this rule, in that the support person was a party to the hearing but the boat was not, yet the boat could be penalized. Another rule indicated that a boat could not be penalized unless they were a party to the hearing. These two rules appeared to contradict each other.

 

The new change fixes this. The definition of party has been expanded to include any competing boat that the support person supports. Now, all the boats linked to that support person in question are now entitled to attend the hearing.

 

A competitor can be penalized for the actions of a support person in two situations. First, if the competitor gains an advantage (rule 64.4(b)(1)). Second, if there has already been a hearing, the support person and the boat have been warned and there is a further breach. This year, the rule requires that the warning must be in writing (rule 64.4(b)(2)) and must come after a hearing. A general warning to all competitors at the beginning of the regatta is not enough.

 

Let me illustrate these two cases. One of the common problems covered by this rule is coaches getting in the way on the course. If the coach got in the way of a boat and this provided a competitive advantage to a boat supported by that coach, then the boat that gained an advantage could be penalized (rule 64.4(b)(1)). If the coach gets in the way, but there is no advantage to any of the boats supported by that coach, then there can be a hearing, after which the coach might be penalized and a warning might be delivered in writing to all of the boats supported by that coach. A repetition of that interference could lead to the boats being penalized.

 

The same rules apply to parents who verbally (or otherwise) attack other competitors or officials at youth regattas. The first time this happens, the parent can be penalized. The second time, after a warning has been delivered in writing, the boat can be penalized as well.
 


Party A party to a hearing is

  1. for a protest hearing: a protestor, a protestee;
  2. for a request for redress: a boat requesting redress or for which redress is requested, a race committee acting under rule 60.2(b), a technical committee acting under rule 60.4(b);
  3. for a request for redress under rule 62.1(a): the body alleged to have made an improper action or omission;
  4. a person against whom an allegation of a breach of rule 69 is made; a person presenting an allegation under rule 69;
  5. a support person subject to a hearing under rule 60.3(d) or 69; any boat that person supports; a person appointed to present an allegation under rule 60.3(d).

 

However, the protest committee is never a party.

 

63.1    Requirement for a Hearing

A boat or competitor shall not be penalized without a protest hearing, except as provided in rules 30.2, 30.3, 30.4, 64.3(d), 64.4(b), 69, 78.2, A5 and P2. A decision on redress shall not be made without a hearing. The protest committee shall hear all protests and requests for redress that have been delivered to the race office unless it allows a protest or request to be withdrawn.

 

63.9 Hearings under Rule 60.3(d) – Support Persons

If the protest committee decides to call a hearing under rule 60.3(d), it shall promptly follow the procedures in rule 63.2, 63.3, 63.4 and 63.6, except that the information given to the parties shall be details of the alleged breach and a person may be appointed by the protest committee to present the allegation.

 

64.4    Decisions Concerning Support Persons

  1. When the protest committee decides that a support person who is a party to a hearing has broken a rule, it may

  2. issue a warning,

  3. exclude the person from the event or venue or remove any privileges or benefits, or

  4. take other action within its jurisdiction as provided by the rules.

  5. The protest committee may also penalize a competitor for the breach of a rule by a support person by changing the boat’s score in a single race, up to and including DSQ, when the protest committee decides that


Posted: 4/29/2019 3:25:24 PM by Andrew Alberti | with 0 comments


Trackback URL: https://rcyc.ca/trackback/939d6db5-761d-4307-9678-3487c1d4a365/March_April_2018_-_A_Small_But_Important_Rules_Change.aspx?culture=en-US

This page provides links to a set of articles original published in Kwasind magazine. The versions here include animated diagrams. The original articles can be found within the original magazines which are available online back to January 2007. 

Articles before December 2016 are based on the Racing Rules of Sailing 2009-12 or 2013-2016 and have not been updated to reflect the changes that apply as of January 2017 with the publication of the Racing Rules of Sailing 2017-20. A copy of the new rules can be found on sailing.org.
ABOUT ANDREW ALBERTI
Andrew Alberti has been writing these monthly articles in the Kwasind since early 1997.  They explain the Racing Rules of Sailing. Andrew is a National Judge and National Umpire. He is a member of the Sail Canada Rules and Appeals Committees. The interpretation of the rules contained in the articles is Andrew's and not that of the RCYC or any of the committees he sits on. 

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
Send your questions to Andrew at kyrules@alberti.ca.

 

ABOUT RCYC: 
166 Years of Tradition | World-Class Sailing | Toronto Island & City Clubhouse
 
June 2020 - An Unusual Start
May 2020 - A Big Collision
March/April 2020 - A Three-Boat Finish
January/February 2020 - An Overview of the Right-of-Way Rules V
November/December 2019 - An Overview of the Right-of-Way Rules IV
Post Archive
June 2020(1)
May 2020(1)
March/April 2020(1)
January/February 2020(1)
November/December 2019(1)
September/October 2019(1)
July/August 2019(1)
May/June 2019(1)
March/April 2019(1)
January/February 2019(1)
November/December 2018(1)
September/October 2018(1)
July/August 2018(1)
May/June 2018(1)
March/April 2018(1)
January/February 2018(1)
November/December 2017(1)
October 2017(1)
September 2017(1)
August 2017(1)
July 2017(1)
June 2017(1)
May 2017(1)
April 2017(1)
March 2017(1)
January/February 2017(1)
December 2016(1)
November 2016(1)
October 2016(1)
September 2016(1)
August 2016(1)
July 2016(1)
June 2016(1)
May 2016(1)
April 2016(1)
March 2016(1)
January/February 2016(1)
December 2015(1)
November 2015(1)
October 2015(1)
September 2015(1)
August 2015(1)
July 2015(1)
June 2015(1)
May 2015(1)
April 2015(1)
March 2015(1)
January 2015(1)
December 2014(1)
November 2014(1)
October 2014(1)
September 2014(1)
August 2014(1)
July 2014(1)
June 2014(1)
May 2014(1)
April 2014(1)
March 2014(1)
January 2014(1)
December 2013(1)
November 2013(1)
October 2013(1)
September 2013(1)
August 2013(1)
July 2013(1)
June 2013(1)
May 2013(1)
April 2013(1)
March 2013(1)
January 2013(1)
December 2012(1)
November 2012(1)
October 2012(1)
September 2012(1)
August 2012(1)
July 2012(1)
June 2012(1)
May 2012(1)
April 2012(1)
March 2012(1)
February 2012(1)
January 2012(1)
December 2011(1)
November 2011(1)
October 2011(1)
September 2011(1)
August 2011(1)
July 2011(1)
June 2011(1)
May 2011(1)
April 2011(1)
March 2011(1)
February 2011(1)
January 2011(1)
November 2010(1)
October 2010(1)
September 2010(1)
August 2010(1)
July 2010(1)
June 2010(1)
May 2010(1)
April 2010(1)
March 2010(1)
February 2010(1)
January 2010(1)
RSS